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happened about 70 miles outside of cairo. one of the regional offices. one person killed in the attack, 60 wounded. here in cairo security forces skirmishes continues you can hear sirens and ambulances as well as tear gas is popped off as several thousand protestors are demonstrating to show their unhappiness. >> gregg: will morsi plan on meeting the judges tomorrow and what will they be talking about? >> as you know the judges across the country have threatened to go out on strike over this power grab by the egyptian president. there has been a meeting scheduled for tomorrow between morrisi and the judges no word of a cancellation. it could be an attempt by the egyptian president to reach out to opponents trying to draw black from the violence that has escalated. what we are waiting for as far as the demonstrations, when pro and anti-people on the ground will try and march. we'll get a gauge of their numbers to see how strong they are. right now opposition figures say they will be no dialogue with the egyptian president until he revokes the decree. >> gregg: give us a sense of the number
. >>> and now to egypt. demonstrators there have taken to the streets in cairo to protest against president mohamed morsi. morsi expanded his powers this week, and that means no one can challenge his decisions. they can't be overturned. that's led to anger among the people and some of the judges. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. >> reporter: thanks have calmed down considerably in cairo's tahrir square. still demonstrators out in tahrir, especially those who pitched tents overnight but the numbers not as what we saw on friday, friday one of the most intense and violent days of demonstrations that we've seen since mr. morsi, the egyptian president took office back in june. more than 140 people injured throughout egypt, according to the health ministry, in clashes between protesters and police. a little under 40 people injured in kay row. several with gunshot wounds. also, more than 200 people arrested and many on charges of thuggery and destroying public property. those arrested seem to be younger men who are out looking for trouble, but certainly thousands showed up to express wha
senior hamas official who said that at 9:00 p.m. cairo time, 10:00 p.m. eastern standard time, that there would be an announcement in cairo, by an official, from the egyptian government and from hamas, announcing some sort of agreement for at least a temporary cease-fire. however, we're hearing from other hamas officials that israel has yet to agree to this proposed cease-fire and the israelis are saying there is nothing as of yet. but the idea is rather than send out broad guidelines for a period of peace and calm, they just want to see if both sides can keep the peace. now, one of the concerns here is that it is not just hamas who is operating in gaza, there are other groups like islamic jihad, affiliated with iran, even smaller splinter groups out there that hamas doesn't necessarily control completely. and therefore that's why they want to give this -- this initial period to see if the peace can indeed or quiet or calm can hold. >> ben, in terms of the entire region, and we're standing sort of by a map which i want to show our viewers, this and is of israel, you've got the
both israel and hamas are in cairo to meet separately with representatives from egypt to advance the cease-fire talks. and, as we mentioned this is all happening as israel's defense minister ehud barak announced he is resigning his post. that's just happening. meanwhile egypt internally embroiled by president mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement. certainly within israel and the political circles that i've been speaking to, at least. it's so
turn violent here in cairo and other cities. buildings torched. police cars torched. a lot of tear gas and pepper spray in the shutdowns between protestors and security forces. and morsi and the top justices. many chief justices here in cairo and across the country they will no longer to go work until the president repeals his decrease for a power grab. we're seen what could be a show down on the streets. that is when supporters on tuesday and saying that he is trying to be a dictator will face off. both opponents and supporters of the president hauling out people and major marches expected on tuesday. >> heather: steve, thank you. >> gregg: contest in the background on egypt's president morsi. he was elected in june of this year after a revolution overthrowing president hosni mubarak. he is head 6 muslim brotherhood. he is the first freely elected president and first islamist to be head of an arab state. they accuse him of trying to monopolize powers, the courts and media and parliament and in the end, sharia law, imposing strict islamic principles. >> heather: it raises new questions
from cairo next. from the journalists of fox news this is "the fox report." americans are always ready to work hard for a better future. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helping millions of americans over the centuries. the strength of a global financial leader. the heart of a one-to-one relationship. together for your future. ♪ [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. at unitedhealthcare insurance company, we understand that commitment. and always have. so does aarp, an organization serving the needs of americans 50 and over for generations. so it's no surprise millions have chosen an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they help cover some of the expenses medicare doesn't pay. and save you up to thousands in o
on this situation with ian lee in cairo tonight. what's the situation right now? >> reporter: well, tom, it's 2:00 a.m. now in cairo. and the protests are still going on. we're still seeing clashes in and around tahrir square between the protesters and the police. we're seeing a range of things thrown back and forth. rocks, we've seen molotov cocktails, we've seen tear gas. there are reports of police shooting into the air to scare off protesters. this is a very intense scene we've seen. we haven't seen anything like this really since a year ago when we saw clashes, when we saw dozens of people killed. this has really been the most intense set of clashes since then and all these protesters are angry about that power grab you were describing where president morsi really has no one overseeing him. the judiciary, he has pushed that aside. he now has really full power and tomorrow, we're going to be watching closely, also, the judiciaries said they might strike basically grinding the whole country's court system to a halt in retaliation for this power grab and also need to point out there are have been
live from cairo. also, destruction, more than 40 buildings taking a hit, in an explosion, some leveled, new tonight, neighbors bringing us inside the horror with stories you will never forget. >> you were startled and then heard screaming and everyone in the buildings are screaming. >> windows are shattered and the window frame is down on the floor. >> harris: the search for answers intensifying as we learn more about split-second decisions that saved lives. >>> and his character left hundreds of millions of viewers asking, who shot jr. remembering larry hagman, the man who played the villain, the world couldn't help loving. i'm harris faulkener well, begin with egypt on edge and turmoil and violence spreading and response to a colossal power grab. by egypt's islamist president, mohamed morsi. though country's rocky transition to democracy may hit a brick wall, two days of violent protest adding to the tension in what is already one of the most volatile regions of the world, mohamed morsi, the newly elected president and head of the muslim brotherhood giving himself near absolute power
brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we have reports from tel aviv, gaza, and cairo. and ray suarez examines the prospects ahead for the peace deal. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports from turkey where the syrian civil war is having an impact along the shared 500 mile border and in ankara. >> with fighting in syrian areas, spilling over into turkish towns, turkey finds itself walking a fine line between defending its interests, and being drawn into a regional war. >> brown: after the deluge: we assess the impact of all the money spent in the most expensive campaign in history. >> woodruff: as recovery costs from superstorm sandy continue to rise, paul solman looks at weather risks and the business of insurance. >> all insurance companies are paying very careful attention to the variability and the volatility in the climate. >> brown: and poet joy harjo celebrates the focal point of families and thanksgiving: the kitchen table. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ye
on tuesday. we begin with holly williams in cairo. >> reporter: there were running street battles in central cairo today as protestors angry with president morsi clashed with the police. they fought with rocks and tear gas canisters in chaotic themes but without either side gaining very much ground. on tahrir square the home of last year's egyptian revolution peaceful protestors are staging a sit-in. they've set up camp and say they will stay until the president rescinds the decree that gave him sweeping new powers. their banner demands an egypt for all egyptians. but less than a year after its transition to democracy this country looks increasingly divided. president morsi reiterated today that his new powers are only temporary. he said he'll relinquish them next year when egyptians will elect a parliament and vote on a new constitution. many people here accept that. but his political opponents like george ishaq are suspicious of both president morsi and the muslim brotherhood, the islamist group from which he draws his support. >> reporter: with their positions so hardened, finding a solut
on the young democracy. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carol. new developments today in tie cairo that could further entangle and muddy what is an already complicated conflict. we have confirmed that next week on december 4th a court in cairo will hear several cases brought against the controversial decrees declared by mr. morsi last week. here's where the intrigue comes in. last week one of his decrees banned anyone, any authority, even the judiciary from questioning and overturning any of his decisions since he took office. we'll see how that plays out. meantime protests continue. there doesn't seem to be a resolution to this conflict. the leaders of the opposition factions have dug in saying we're not going to have dialogue until mr. morsi rescinds his decrees. a few hours ago we spoke to one of his top advisers and we asked him, is that a possibility? >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make. >> this decision is up to the president, not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible he will rescind his decrees. >> dialogue wi
. >> i'm zoraida sambolin. >> in egypt the u.s. embassy in cairo is closed. no one is being allowed in or out of the embassy now. embassy officials say the entrance is blocked by protesters as clashes erupt nearby. massive demonstrations against president morsy threatened the new young government after a degree last week extending his powers to an e uneasy level for some egyptians. americans in cairo going to the embassy for business, please don't. no one is going in or out of the embassy in cairo. >> and finding a way to steer clear of the fiscal cliff. the chief fiscal cliff negotiator tim geithner working with leaders to get things moving. there are just 33 days left to get a deal done. congress breaks for the holidays in just 15 days. dan lothian joins us. so the clock is ticking away. >> after the meeting the president had after he went to southeast asia the lawmakers were optimistic. now you are hearing some pessimistic as the clock winds down. you see the president pushing the bush era tax cut extension for middle class america. the white house doesn't believe this is the com
you overseas where the u.s. embassy in cairo is shutting its doors to the public today as police clash with demonstrators in a new round of violent protests in tahrir square. all this comes as we wait to hear from president morsi who's expected to appear on egyptian television, and it could be his appearance as soon as this hour. steve harrigan's in cairo with more. steve? >> reporter: jenna, the protesters are out behind me for the or seventh night in a row, and as you mentioned, part of the u.s. embassy -- the part that deals with the public and visitor -- was shut down today not because the embassy was targeted, but really because of fears of peripheral violence. this whole section of downtown cairo has seen large street protests for the last several days, police and protesters exchanging rocks and tear gas. two buildings on this street were set on fire overnight. those blazes are now out. we are expecting to see egypt's president in a taped television address later today. he'll likely be introducing a new constitution that's being voted on by the assembly now. that constitution can
that video of the protests there in cairo. we'll have to see where this goes. the great fear is that the muslim brotherhood, like other fascist organizations, will be one man, one vote, one time. and we've seen the muslim blo brotherhood move very swift tloi consolidate their power. >> the u.s. stood squarely behind israel throughout this conflict. does that quiet any critics who thought president obama was soft on israeli security? >> i think it absolutely should. what we saw even before the election here in the united states is that netanyahu has said time and again even in the face of critics that there has been no stronger ally to israel than the united states. the criticism kept comincoming, though. after this incident, i really do think the critics will be quieted. there's a lot of talk about how successful the iron dome program wus was. it deflected over 80% of the rockets that were fired into israel. president obama has committed more funding to iron dome. and i think that it really does cement the fact that this president and this administration has been a tremendous
on the phone with mohamed morici in cairo brokering a cease-fire between hamas and israel as a predicate for his visit to the white house later on this season. i also want to mention that this is not a one-dimensional problem for israel. hezbollah in the north i'm being told is being consulted by hamas to launch its rockets to the north of israel. in addition, jordan is aflame with muslim brother provocati s provocations. and there's a dark hand here. the rockets were fired into tel aviv today not just by the islamic jihad but by the control agents of the islamic jihad, iran. iran is part of this matrix, larry. >> i totally believably. rich, in light of what john just said, this thing could spread throughout the whole region. we've got now syria, lebanon, hezbollah. of course, hamas, which i think israel is going to wipe away. what about egypt? what about turkey? and what about iran? in other words, how big is this going to be? how much is this going to spread? this may become a massive world event. may become, for all i know, a financial market event. but i want to ask both of you gent
that are the cease fire talks going on inside cairo and obviously secretary of state hillary clinton's visit here over the next 24 to 36 hours may delay a ground invasion. the question is, is it enough to actually get a cease fire deal on the table and signed between hamas jihad, and israel here on the other side. guys? >> steve: a lot of moving parts. what do you know about apparently earlier today an employee at the u.s. embassy in tel aviv was apparently stabbed by somebody. what's up with that? >> exactly. what it appears to be is that a local jewish man here, an israeli was upset h a personal beef with someone who was a local employee of the embassy and as though you would go to any workplace and try to take out your anger there at the person who happened to be working there, that's what happened. it seems unrelated to anything having to do with the united states. the embassy a coincidence that the man was so angry with was a guard there. thankfully fort guard, there were other people who subdued the attacker. but totally unrelated to things going on here or for that matter, the u.s. embassy
, thousands of protesters spilling into the streets of cairo again this morning demanding president mohammed morsi be thrown out of office. they are angry over morsey's decision to give himself sweeping powers. a massive power grab on thursday into friday. peter doocy joins us live from d.c. with the latest. peter, this was frightening at how quick it happened and how it came immediately after susan rice praised what mr. morsey did there. >> right, dave. and mohammed morsi is actually egypt's first democratically elected president. but many of his people are protesting because he issued this decree that puts all his decisions in the past, present and future above judicial review. he can do whatever he wants and the lower courts can't. ' assembly writing egypt's new constitution can do so without any objections now, the u.s. state department issued a statement making their reservations about president morsey crystal clear and basically stating that the entire idea of the arab spring was the opposite of what's happening in egypt. the state department says, quote: one of the aspirations of the
of hamas have been in cairo. they've been meeting with officials. they've told them their conditions for a cease fire. here in gaza, the indication is a cease fire may still be off in the horizon. >> we were hearing, at least from israeli television stations here, that 90% of the conditions for the cease fire were there. that's what hamas was saying, at least, visa is-- vis-a-vis thes israeli networks. what are they saying? >> reporter: the way they've been framing the cease fire talks more about what the two sides want. both sides don't want war, at least they claim so. they both want to come out victorious from these two things. in terms of what hamas has been asking for, they've been asking for a guarantee from israel to not resume assassinations in the killing of its senior leaders, as we saw on wednesday. they're also calling on all the sides, including israel and egypt, to lift the blockade and siege on gaza that's crippled life here. for israel, they want to see a guarantee, not only in the short term that palestinian factions will stop firing rockets, but they want a long-ter
the fiscal cliff. >>> developing now, new clashes in cairo, egypt today, between protesters and police. the protesters have been demanding that egypt's new president rescind the decree he had last thursday granting him absolute power. tens of thousands of protesters rallied in caikacairo's tahrir square. two of e jim's top courts today suspended their work in protest of president mohamed morsi's decr decree. joining me to talk more about the middle east is ambassador dennis ross, an expert on the region. he was the chief middle east negotiate for president clinton and president bush and served as a special adviser for president obama. he is a mideast analyst. both supporters and opponents are planning more giant protests on friday as well as sad. what's your assessment of the situation and the back and forth between the two sides? >> well, i think what we're seeing is is that this is a new egypt. anybody who thought that president morsi could come in and act like president mubarak and could rule as opposed to govern, there's no doubt that's not the case. there's no doubt he miscalculat
to jerusalem and cairo. here's dean rhodes. >> secretary clinton will depart today and travel to jerusalem ramallah and cairo leaving. she will meet with our israeli partners to consult on the situation in gaza. >> john: that's ben rhodes. he actually discussed who secretary clinton will and will not be speaking with. >> i can assure you she will be meeting with the palestinian authority. united states has not engaged directly with hamas. hamas has not met the conditions we've set for many years to renounce terrorism to recognize israel's right to exist. >> john: by palestinian authority, i presume he meeds mahmoud abbas who it seems is completely powerless at all because abbas no habla no abbas. we'll be taking your calls when we return. it is "bill press show." 1-866-55-press. >> announcer: chatting with you live at current.com/billpress this is the "bill press show." live on your radio and current tv. dose of politics from a fresh perspective. >>i'm a slutty bob hope. the troops love me. >>only on current tv. these talking poin
the compound in central cairo. the protesters, they are actually not targeting the embassy. they have been demonstrating, however, for a week. there has been some fighting with riot police around tahrir square. they've got rocks, tear gas being hurled in the streets. demonstrators, they are trying to force president mohammed morsi to give back some of the sweeping powers that he seized earlier in the week. want to go live to cairo. reza sayah is overlooking tahrir square. is it calm where you are, and are people assuming that things are going to get better? there are a lot of critics who vague the broum brotherhood is really now trying to hijack the process, hijack the constitution and get the president to remain in power, as much power as he can hold on to. >> yeah. many of those critics, suzanne, are behind us. still demonstrating here in tahrir square. in the meantime, major developments unfolding. as we speak right now, egypt's constitutional assembly is voting to approve a draft of egypt's all-important new constitution. this is going to be the backbone, the centerpiece of egypt's dem
it is the cairo speech that you delivered in 2009 or your repeated and important declarations on prevention of iran's nuclear capabilities, actions matter most. don't mistake the former for the latter. and today i just have to step out of my role for a moment because as a historian today is the anniversary of my favorite ever presidential statement on the middle east. 70 years ago today, president franklin delano roosevelt issued the following statement for the people of the middle east. just imagine a president saying that. praise be to you and the name of god the passionate, the merciful. may god be upon you. this is a great day for you because behold a week, the american warriors have arrived. we have come here to fight the great jihad of freedom. we have come to set you free. today is the 70th anniversary of the landing on north africa and prisoner agreed jihad of american freedom once again but we don't remember that because words matter so much less than actions. if those are three broad lessons were the three most urgent issues on your agenda here won't repeat the words of my colleag
that there are talks going none cairo right now with the egyptians acting as an incident intermediary to try have some expire that deal could happen within 24 to 48 hours which might delay the israeli ground assault a little bit. however, the israelis say they are already ready. they have authorization for 75,000 reservists to be called up. and in this part of the country, this that is a lot. can i tell you from driving around in israel that in just four or five days since this all began, israel has changed from seemingly normal to all of the sudden a country on a war footing understandably because of the millions of their people are under assault every day as we stand all around southern israel. we hear the air raid sirens go off. we know that the militants are firing out of gaza towards these open areas. just hoping that some level that they might hit an idf position. so. israeli army forces that are massing here. back to you in new york. >> leland, you talk about militant positions, interesting that the israeli government, specifically benjamin netanyahu's office tweeting this morning and if you ca
but celebrating it. while secretary of state clinton is in cairo trying to negotiate a cease-fire between israel and hamas with the help of egypt she is closely monitoring reports from tel aviv and in constant contact with prime minister benjamin netanyahu's team. we have word this morning of a deadly attack in benghazi, libya. the chief of police has been assassinated overnight. three unidentified gunmen have targeted colonel outside of his home in a drive-by shooting. he was transported to a medical facility and reportedly died en route. he was appointed the head of security after the september 11th attack on our consulate there. bbc reports more than a dozen security officers have been killed in the eastern libyan city so far this year. we'll have more stephanie after the break. you're always welcome to join us in chat online. go to current.com/stephaniemiller. we'll see you after the break. now? you know the kind of guys who do like reverse mortgage commercials? those types are coming on to me all of the time now. >> she g
'm charlie d'agata, gaza city. >>> clachling victory for a different reason. clarissa ward is in cairo where the truce agreement was sealed yesterday. what are the possible sticking points in this new cease fire agreement? >> reporter: good morning, charlie. good morning, gayle. happy thanksgiving. the main sticking point that may arrive with this agreement is that in the third clause of that cease fire agreement that essentially says after a cooling off period israel must start opening up gaza borders and allow for free passage of trade and also people. israel is very reticassant of lifting that blockade. you may see weapons into the hands of militants but hamas is adamant that that blockade needs to be lifted. a few sticking points raised with that one. >> what does the role that egypt played mean for egypt and the region going forward? >> reporter: egypt has definitely emerged as the winner in all of this. secretary of state clinton calling it a cornerstone of stability in the region. and i think the west had been a little bit concerned about how egypt's recentl
this morning. the crash happened 190 miles south of cairo and the children were on their way to kindergarten at the time. there were prorts the crossing gates weren't down when the bus crossed the tracks. >>> it is about 19 after the hour and here is lonny with the first check of the weather. >> good morning to you. good morning, everybody. what i want to do let's get right to the satellite and radar picture. the first thing you'll notice about 60% of the country at this hour is cloud free. there are a couple of areas that had disturbed weather today and one of which offshore the central florida coast, this will bring rain anywhere from florida into portions of south carolina. it is not terribly heavy. know the bulk stays offshore. this is an entirely different set up for the pacific northwest and not just one but two systems lined up back-to-back and actually a third one behind that. this is a pattern that will last into the middle of the week with rain, snow and wind. a quick look at the national picture. here is a closer look at the weather for your weekend. >>> all right.
, rick stengel of "time" magazine is standing by just back from cairo where they had an exclusive sit-down with mohamed morsi, the new president of egypt. e mirror, they see more than themselves. so we celebrate our year-end with the "share the love" event. get a great deal on a new subaru and 250 dollars goes to your choice of five charities. by the end of this, our fifth year, our total can reach almost 25 million dollars. it's a nice reflection on us all. now through january 2nd. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. without freshly-made pasta. you could also cut corners by making it without 100% real cheddar cheese. but then...it wouldn't be stouffer's mac & cheese. just one of over 70 s
employee keeping the office open. and when something really big happens in cairo, when something really big happens in mexico city, in beijing, in hong kong, what you do is you ship in one of the star correspondents, or even an anchor. but the difference between covering the news, year after year after year in a country, maybe even learning the language, certainly getting to know the people, getting to know who the movers and shakers are, and what the political dynamic in that country is, that really is not happening much anymore. and parenthetically, what's happening in our business is also happening over in the intelligence field, at the cia. where quite literally -- >> i don't want to go too far there. we're -- i want to talk to you about the role of cable television. which you touched on before. in a recent interview with bill o'reilly of fox, you've derided ideological coverage of the news, bad for america, you said, making it difficult if not impossible for congress to reach across the aisle and find compromise. you also wrote an op-ed piece, this is not good for the republic. what do
's new democratically elected leader. crowds protested at cairo's square, calling for president mohammed morsi. he says the courts cannot overrule his decisions, but protesters who helped overthrow the old regime led by mubarak warn egypt's new government hasn't chaingsd. >> this is a new era of dictatorship in egypt. this is not what the revolution was about. the revolution was about stripping the president from all of these unquestioned rights. >> morsi supporters say the move is temporary until a new constitution is implemented in a few months. they call it a necessary move to defeat holdovers from the mubarak regime. but opponents are now calling him a dictator. >>> iran is accusing the u.s. of trying to stir up trouble in the persian gulf. in letters to the u.n. secretary general and the security council, tehran claims american ships are carrying out, quote, illegal and provocative acts in the gulf and the sea of oman, ignoring radio warnings and flown into iran air space. so far, the white house has not commented about these allegations. >>> if congress and president obama do not a
. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. >> reporter: this attempt by the government to push through a draft constitution in one day's time was an effort to stem the process it appears to have backfired. we are seeing greater numbers of opposition protestors out on the street today, they seem to be energized by this move by the government. already sharp criticism of this new draft constitution, criticism that it fails to protect the rights of women, also concerns about the role of islamic law in this new constitution. the next step is for a referendum. president morsi has 30 days to put it to a vote across the nation. he has said when the constitution is ratified he will give up the extraordinarys he assumed last week. it was that move by the president that really kicked off these processes. we have large crowds now of anti-more se anti-moris demonstrators and tphopl we will probably see large crowds of pro-mori demonstrators. back to you. jenna: steve harrigan with the sounds of the street behind him. steve thank you. jon: a ten-year-old girl vanished from her neighborhood in florid
there are cease-fire negotiations going on inside cairo and today the prime minister says the israeli army is ready for the escalation, the only thing that would mean a ground war and came at 24 hours notice to put a cease-fire deal on the table or tanks will be headed across these fields. >> dave: say staff, my friend. it's complicated by the fact that turkey, tunisia, u.s. allies, democratic governments appear early side hamas. >> ainsley: can't take living here in america for granted. can you imagine that, hearing the sirens and hunker down and find a rock. >> clayton: all tw take would be one rocket. and let's check the weather and rick reichmuth is looking at the forecast, headed into the big travel week. >> rick: everybody wants to know whether they can get home. what the weather looks like, look at the sunny icons there, that's good. temps not bad. plenty of sunshine, no big storms or wind that's going to impede air travel. across the west, a bit of a different story, and across area of the northwest and northern california where we'll see some rain and some showers, it's not going
. >> secretary of state clinton has arrived in cairo egypt and met with president mohammed morse i. the chances of them reaching a deal about the issues surrounding gaz are are extremely unlikely. they're looking to avert a ground war. >> thank you very much. here's savannah. >> matt, thanks. meantime, black friday is two days away now. the most important day of the year foror the nation's retaile. trouble may be brewing for one of the biggest ones of all. walmart. mark potter is live in doral, florida this morning. mark, good morning. >> good morning, savannah. about a thousand protests are scheduled around the country and walmart is trying to stop them. most of them will be happening on the busiest shopping day of the year. >> we are the workers! the mighty walmart workers! >> a few of the protests have begun. >> this one tuesday out outside a walmart near los angeles. store workers and stoare complaining about hours and retaliati retaliation. >> the wages are low. sometimes we have to rely on family help. >> they're very good with the prices. but the prices are coming out our pockets. >> som
that the attack began spontaneously following protests earlier that day at our embassy at cairo. we provided. the wee is the intelligence director. we use that information to discuss it intelligently. we continue to emphasize that the information gathered was preliminary and evil thing." end quote. i then asked ambassador patrick kennedy of the state department, who testified at the hearing, whether he had any reason to doubt that ambassador rice had relied on the information from the national intelligence director. he replied, "know, and misses morton. when i came up to give a briefing earlier this week, both of us were relying on the same information. if i or any other senior administration official, career or non-career, would have been on that television show other than susan rice, we would have said the same thing because we were drawing on the same intelligence information that was then available to us. this has been, as you all know, an evolving situation. what we knew that first week and that first weekend had evolved over time. we know much more now than we knew then. we have no rep
in cairo as we speak. we have been deeply involved in helping to stand them up, and we are going to carefully consider what more we can do. i will be having much more to say about that as we move toward the friends of the syrian people meeting in morocco in the second week of december. no other decisions have been made yet, but we consider them on an almost daily basis. at the united states has provided more than $200 million in humanitarian assistance -- syrian people who weapon displaced are facing difficult conditions given the winter that is upon them. this remains a very difficult situation to manage because there are so many interests by all of the players, many of which are contradictory. turkey, for example, is very much at the leadership level, committed to seeing the end of the syrian regime, but incredibly worried that not enough will be done that empowers the kurds, particularly the pkk affiliates. jordan is working hard to maintain stability inside its own country. they are obviously worried about upsetting the delicate demographic balance inside. lebanon has tried v
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